The Wolf Lords on Readers’ Favorite

A immortal warlock bent on reprisal.
An ancient order of sorcerers hungry for power.
Warriors beset by armies of demons.
And a lonely hedge witch whose dark secrets could change everything.
…If only they could find her.

The word is in from Readers’ Favorite for The Wolf Lords, Book Two in the The Fylking! I am grateful and humbled to have received five five-star reviews. Didn’t see that coming. Here’s some bling, with a link at the bottom where you can read the reviews in full.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

“This second novel in The Fylking series exceeded all of my expectations for a fantasy novel. An alluring plot weaves intrigue that tempts you into the world of invisible warriors, magical spells and demons. The characters are so vivid and enchanting, they practically leap from the page. I especially loved the tortured, heartbroken character of Othin, who tries to overcome losing his true love. The author’s writing style is beautifully descriptive with so much detail that it draws you completely into the world of the characters. Her ability to build tension and develop character relationships is extraordinary. I could not help compare the storyline to Nordic folklore. This is a gem of a novel.” – Lesley Jones

“The Wolf Lords is definitely a novel for adults. Its dark themes and strains of graphic violence give it an edge. I was easily invested in the story right from the beginning. The vivid imagery and the realistic descriptions just lured me right in and had me reading on until the very end. The story itself is very complex and has layers upon layers of plot that I loved to uncover. The character development was simply amazing. The Fenrir Brotherhood was an enigma that I was very interested in and I also loved the mystery behind the witch who just didn’t want to be found. I loved the flow, enjoyed the setting, and simply cannot wait for the next novel in the series. Very entertaining.” – Rabia Tanveer

“This epic fantasy is a series that had the same effect The Lord of the Rings had on me. The narrative is focused and the author imagines worlds where conflict thrives easily and creates powerful factions with conflicting interests and characters that are sophisticated. The Wolf Lords explores the role played by The Fenrir Brotherhood, an ancient order of sorcerers with dreadful secrets, in a phenomenal conflict. The action is intense and pulsating and the scenes are so beautifully written that they leave vivid images in the minds of readers. F.T. McKinstry establishes a unique, strong signature in the genre of epic fantasy with a series that will set readers on an exciting adventure.” – Christian Sia

“Written for adults due to its dark nature and graphic violence, this is also a highly political and complex tale… The depth of the reading experience is very worthwhile as author F. T. McKinstry puts a lot into the worldbuilding, lore, and history of this setting, giving traditional fantasy fans a lot to sink their teeth into. Different factions have their own ideas about how the world, and the other worlds beyond it, should be run or destroyed, and it’s this mixture of powerful forces which gives the story its excitement. Overall, The Wolf Lords is a superbly told immersive fantasy novel sure to please hardcore fans the world over.” – K.C. Finn

“This is a story that explores the allure of power and the ills that come with it. Conflict is developed at multiple levels and it is interesting how the author builds segments of power and creates powerful groups to oppose each other. The language is unique and the people inhabiting the worlds the author creates have a unique way of naming things. While the characters are drawn from different worlds, the author imbues them with a realism that makes them not so very different from mortals. A sophisticated plot with compelling characters and gorgeous prose. The Wolf Lords follows the tale of an ancient order poised to redeem a world quickly falling apart. It is intense and deeply moving.” – Romuald Dzemo

Check out the full reviews on the Readers’ Favorite Review Page.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

The Wolf Lords Cover ArtThe Destroyer of the Math Gate has not been idle in the sun’s turn since he nearly defeated the Fylking, his ancient enemies. Wounded, bitter and bent on reprisal, the immortal warlock has gathered an army. He has acquired a spell that will damage the veil between the worlds. And he is waiting.

The Fenrir Brotherhood is an ancient order of sorcerers who serve the Wolf Gods of the North. Haunted by a dark history, the brotherhood keeps to itself—or so it is generally believed. But the older something is, the more secrets it keeps, and the Wolf Lords have not only unleashed an army of demons across the land, but also let the Destroyer in.

When the Veil falls, war erupts and the realm is faced with legions of Otherworld beings, it is left to a sorcerer hunted by the Wolf Lords and a company of King’s Rangers broken by grief and trauma to find a hedge witch whose secrets could change everything.

Unfortunately, she is hiding between the worlds.

Read for free with Kindle Unlimited.
Amazon

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Outpost Cover ArtOutpost, Book One in The Fylking.

A race of immortal warriors who live by the sword.
A gate between the worlds.
Warriors, royals, seers and warlocks living in uneasy peace on one side of the Veil.
Until now.

“The tone is excellent, reminiscent of some of the earliest examples of grim Norse fantasy.” – G.R. Matthews, Fantasy Faction
Finalist, SPFBO 2016

Read for free with Kindle Unlimited.

© F.T. McKinstry 2019. All Rights Reserved.

New Release! The Riven God, 2nd Edition

Introducing the Second Edition of The Riven God, Book Four in the Chronicles of Ealiron.
Get it on Amazon. Available on Kindle Unlimited.

Novel, 359 pages
Ebook includes links to maps and a glossary.
Can be read as a standalone story.
The First Edition of this work was originally published as Ascarion by Double Dragon Publishing.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

In the world of Ealiron, it is known that wizards and gods rarely involve themselves in the affairs of mortals. They see war or the collapse of empires as they would a leaf decaying on a forest floor. Everything has its time. This changes when a mysterious rift appears in the timeline of the world, cloaked on the isle of Tromb in the far northern Gray Isles.

Rhinne of Tromb, a lonely princess at odds with a turbulent monarchy, has old magic in her veins. When weary defiance and a penchant for a fight lands her on the wrong side of a dark order of warlocks festering in the shadows of the realm, Rhinne is forced to flee, pursued by the king’s assassins. Her brother Wulfgar, a seasoned warrior, is left facing war.

Far away, Lorth of Ostarin, a powerful wizard, learns that something untoward is happening in the Gray Isles, where he has a dark history. When Rhinne is delivered into his hands under unlikely circumstances, he discovers she is not only being hunted by foreign assassins, but also has the ability to channel immortals. Wounded and distrustful, she escapes him with the help of a god thought destroyed centuries ago. Only he knows her secrets, and he’s not telling.

Believing his sister dead, Wulfgar arrives from overseas to the wizards’ citadel, heavy with grief and bearing information that moves the wizards to declare war. Through a labyrinth of assassins, thieves, spies and seers, Rhinne, Wulfgar and Lorth return to Tromb accompanied by an army, a mysterious raven and a war god with a private agenda. In the battle that awaits them, they must find and destroy a cruel, devious entity who has something to hide and can turn the fabric of reality into horrific desolation with a thought.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

“F.T. McKinstry is a master of this genre. Her prose, plot and character development make her books an incredible joy to read. The Chronicles of Ealiron is my absolute favorite series.” – Amazon Customer Review

© F.T. McKinstry 2018. All Rights Reserved.

Demon Tamer

This story is based on an excerpt from The Wolf Lords. It’s a tale about a hedge witch, two dodgy ravens and a sea monster with a score to settle.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Old women tell tales of Otherworld beings one must never tangle with. Powerful, elusive and malevolent, these beings will lay traps around one’s ignorance and need, if given the chance. But once in an age, a mortal comes along who dares to either cross or bargain with such creatures…and a darker tale is born.

Ingifrith, an ordinary hedge witch, thinks little of such tales until she falls afoul of the Fenrir Brotherhood, an ancient order of sorcerers who serve the Wolf Gods of the North. They know her secrets. They know her weaknesses. And she has something they want.

So does the sea witch who lures and traps her into a nasty bargain—in return for protection from the Brotherhood’s reach. Fleeing for her life with nothing but a scrap of advice given to her by a demon warlord, Ingifrith must use her wits to trick a seasoned pirate out of a stolen charm, a feat that will either get her killed or placed in the hands of the sorcerers hunting her.

It’s often a good idea to heed old women.

Hell Hath No Fury

Novelette
Pages: 43
Add to Goodreads

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© F.T. McKinstry 2018. All Rights Reserved.

Guest Post on Mighty Thor JRS!

Today I have the pleasure—nay, the honor—of being a guest over at Mighty Thor JRS, one of my favorite fantasy book blogs. I’ll be talking about the venerable wolf and raven, their place in myth, folklore, and my own work; and their ancient association with Odin, the Allfather in the Norse pantheon and a patron of warriors, magicians, and poets alike. If you’re into Norse mythology, shady creatures, shapeshifters, shamans, berserkers and the like, and you’d like to see some art inspired by such things, stop by for a visit:

Wolves, Ravens and the Hooded One

My heartfelt thanks to James Schmidt for this wicked fun opportunity to geek out. 🙂

The Wanderer

The Wanderer

© F.T. McKinstry 2017. All Rights Reserved.

Land of the Ice and Snow

Dark Mountains

In my eternal quest for mood-inducing music, I created a playlist on Spotify that attempts to capture the soul of the North, and I’d like to share. Norse tribal, dark ambient, folk, metal–I’m aiming for an atmosphere reminiscent of towering forests, mountains, wolves, ravens, gods, Vikings, howling wind, blazing fires, rough seas, seiðr, shamans, blood and runes.

Good times.

Here you’ll find Wardruna, Ulf Söderberg, Anilah, Forndom, Skogen, among others. I’m always tinkering with and adding new music to this, a loving work in progress, like a painting. It’s one of my favorite backgrounds for writing and reading broody tales, or when I’m not all here and need to weigh anchor.

It’s called Gods of the North.

© F.T. McKinstry 2017. All Rights Reserved.

Lorth of Ostarin

Lorth of Ostarin

“Lorth of Ostarin serves himself first, the Otherworld second, and the rest of us last.” – From The Riven God

A driving force throughout the Chronicles of Ealiron, Lorth of Ostarin is a complex character with a bent towards bringing things to their darkest ends. Lorth was born to a mysterious warrior he never knew and a peasant woman who died when Lorth was a small boy. He is raised by a wizard who trains him in the arts of magic, against the tenets of his order. When he reaches manhood, Lorth leaves his mentor and seeks his fortune as an assassin, a trade to which he is well suited and well paid, as he uses his arcane skills to hunt. Tall and lean with the pale skin of a Northman, Lorth’s most distinguishing characteristics are his eyes, which are green-gold and penetrating, like those of a wolf; and a five-rayed scar on his neck left by a near-fatal spider bite.

While ambivalent in his loyalties to humans, Lorth likes animals, finding them to be true guides and companions in the wilds of his dark business. It is not unusual to find Lorth in the company of ravens, clever, opportunistic creatures that form bonds with predators. Like a wolf, Lorth tends to leave death in his wake. And the spider, after nearly killing him, gifted him with a deep-rooted sensitivity to trouble.

Lawless and disinclined to abide rules or protocols, Lorth serves only the laws of nature and the Old One, a goddess of life, death, and transformation. By that, he loves his homeland, respects women and has an intuitive connection to the balance in all things, a skill to which wizards refer as a “web,” a rare ability to see the Old One’s hand in mortal affairs. This seeming paradox between the ordered light of a mage and the primeval darkness of a hunter drives Lorth to extraordinary—albeit dreadful—acts of violence, power and beauty.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

The Hunter's Rede CoverLorth’s adventures begin in The Hunter’s Rede, Book One in the Chronicles of Ealiron, a swords-and-sorcery tale of transformation by the forces of war, betrayal, wizardry and love.

Lorth of Ostarin is an assassin trained by a wizard unknown to his kind. He is paid very well to employ both the primeval darkness of a hunter and the ordered light of a mage, an uneasy combination he does not question until he returns home after a long assignment and trips into a turbid river of war, politics and the violation of all he holds dear. Lawless and adept, he picks no sides and takes no prisoners. When his wolfish ways get him imprisoned for crimes he did not commit, he discovers the deeper source of his ability and falls in love with a priestess who frees him to his fate. But the rift in his heart widens under the forces of love, loyalty and the occupation of his realm by a warlord who honors neither hunters nor wizards. To reclaim his homeland, Lorth must bow his head to death itself, a sacrifice that will transform him into the most powerful hunter the land has ever known.

© F.T. McKinstry 2017. All Rights Reserved.

Ranger of the North Branch

Othin of Cae Forres

Othin of Cae Forres

From Outpost, Book One in The Fylking.

The King’s Rangers are an elite brotherhood of warriors who keep order in the wilds of Dyrregin. They are seasoned, skilled in fighting, traversing and surviving in rough terrain and dangerous circumstances, and employ a complex system of messaging through riders and ravens trained to scout patrol routes and recognize their rangers’ appearance. The rangers report directly to the King through five captains who command the areas within the arms of the Gate pentacle: North Branch, East Branch, Southeast Branch, Southwest Branch, and West Branch. The rangers’ motto is “We keep the balance when the gods turn away.”

Rangers' Coat of Arms

Rangers’ Coat of Arms

Othin of Cae Forres, shown above, is a Ranger of the North Branch. Named after the Raven God (Othin is an alternate spelling of Odin), a god of wisdom, trickery and war, he serves his brotherhood with honor until the woman he loves, a peasant girl named Melisande who is touched by the gods, gets him into trouble. For love of her, he lands on the wrong side of a political trap and flees into the wilds to save his skin and discover truth amid a rat’s nest of deception and betrayal.

Storms of War

When war seizes the realm, Othin must navigate bounty hunters, the living dead abominations of a renegade warlock, and a mysterious Otherworld shade that might be friend or foe. But his greatest challenge will be dealing with a malevolent immortal warlord who has set his sights on Melisande.

All in a day’s work…

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Outpost Cover ArtOutpost, Book One in The Fylking.

A race of immortal warriors who live by the sword.
A gate between the worlds.
Warriors, royals, seers and warlocks living in uneasy peace on one side of the Veil.
Until now.

© F.T. McKinstry 2017. All Rights Reserved.

Outpost: Terms and Places

outpost glossary

Welcome to the Glossary for Outpost, Book One in The Fylking. Here you’ll find names, places, creatures and terms, including illustrations and references to relevant entries and posts.

Place names can be found on the following map. Click to zoom.

Realm of Dyrregin

Realm of Dyrregin (click to zoom)

The glossary (text only) and map are also included in the book.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Aegir Sea: A large sea south of the Njorth Sea beyond the borders of Skolvarin and Fjorgin.

Ageton: A captain in the King’s Rangers. Commands the North Branch.

Angvald: King of Dyrregin, House of Merhafr.

Annalis: A Warden of Dyrregin from Olsc Amathin. See also Wardens’ Order.

Anselm: Eldest son of Damjan, the Master of House Jarnstrom. See also Jarnstrom Forge.

Aoneg (ah NEG): A vast, forested realm five hundred leagues west of Skolvarin over the Aegir Sea.

Apex: A term used by the Fylking for Tower Sif, which stands on the northernmost point of the Gate in the Vale of Ason Tae. Here the world of Math merges with an array of other worlds on which the Fylking conduct their business. The first line of defense again their enemies, it is guarded accordingly. See also Ason Tae, Fylking, Gate, Sif.

Arcmael

Arcmael

Arcmael: A Warden of Dyrregin. Son and heir of Lord Detlef Halstaeg. See also Detlef Halstaeg, Wardens’ Order. See post The Wardens’ Order.

Arrival of the Fylking: A historical account, often told as a myth, of the arrival of the Fylking to the world of Math roughly nine thousand years ago. The term is also used to indicate a reference date. See also Fylking, Return of the Fylking. See post The Wardens’ Order.

Arvakr: A horse belonging to Captain Ageton of the North Branch of the King’s Rangers.

Ason Tae: A vale located on the northern border of Dyrregin, cradled by mountain ranges and forests. Being far north, somewhat isolated and home to Tower Sif, the Apex of the Gate, Ason Tae is thought by outlanders to be wild, uncanny and dangerous. See also Apex, Gate, Sif. See Map of Dyrregin.

The Vale of Ason Tae

The Vale of Ason Tae

Banishing Sigil: A spell used by wardens to banish the Fylking. Involves moving the hand in a specific pattern. Created by the Fylking and taught to wardens to honor and acknowledge their free will, the sigil prompts the Fylking to leave a warden’s presence until he or she decides otherwise. Upon the foundation of the Wardens’ Order, the Fylking vowed never to violate this agreement. See also Exile Sigil, Fylking, Wardens’ Order.

Bear’s End: A large, rambling inn on the North Mountain Road, in Wyrvith Forest, surrounded by mossy, overgrown ruins, crumbling walls and dangerous underground passages. Originally built as a keep by a Catskoll warlord called the Bear, it was never finished, and the destruction of the Catskoll army is shrouded in mystery. See also Catskoll, North Mountain Road, Wyrvith Forest.

BlackthornBlackthorn Guild: An order of witches and warlocks created by King Magnfred, the first ruler to claim Dyrregin’s throne after the Gate War. Traditional dress is shades of brown and green stitched with branches. See also Gate War.

Blanch River: A river in Austr just south of the Ogjan Mountains.

Bren: A King’s Ranger of the North Branch. Sensitive to the Otherworld. Best friend of Othin of Cae Forres.

Bythe: A goatherd who lives outside of Odr, in sight of Tower Sif in the Vale of Ason Tae. See also Ason Tae, Odr, Sif.

Cathouse: A brothel. In Dyrregin, it’s traditional for cathouses to keep actual cats as pets. See also Night Guild.

Catskoll: A realm south of Skolvarin over the Aegir Sea.

Ceirn River: A river flowing from Lake Ceirn into the Njorth Sea, south of Grayfen.

Coldevin: Lord and Master of Arms for the Dyrregin Guard. Reports to King Angvald. See also Dyrregin Guard.

Hooded Crow

Hooded Crow

Crow Warrior: A mysterious Otherworld being that appears as a warrior riding a gray horse, dressed in gray and black and wearing the face of a bird with a long, black beak. Often shapeshifts into a hooded crow. See post The Trickster.

Damjan: An acclaimed swordsmith and the Master of Jarnstrom, a famous smithy in Odr. See also Jarnstrom Forge, Odr.

Detlef Halstaeg: Lord and High Constable of the King’s Rangers. Cousin of the late King Farcas. Reports to Lord Coldevin. Father of Arcmael, a Warden of Dyrregin. See also King’s Rangers.

Diderik: a captain in the Dyrregin Guard.

Dog: A mutt rescued from a cruel owner by Arcmael, a Warden of Dyrregin.

Dragon Warrior: An Otherworld rider clad in shining black scaled armor and a helmet shaped like a dragon’s head. Able to summon wind and storms.

Draugr

Draugr

Draugr (DROG err): A malevolent being created by Fylking sorcery for the purpose of striking anguish and terror into one’s foes. The spirit of a mortally wounded warrior is trapped between the worlds in order to control it. Partly in the mortal dimension and partly beyond, the draugr are unnaturally strong, able to shapeshift into mist or fog, and cannot be killed. This magic is forbidden, a violation of Elivag. Colloquially referred to as “ghouls.” See also Elivag, Fylking. See post A Zombie by Any Other Name.

Dyrregin (deer EGG in): In Fylking, “gateway of the gods.” A war-torn realm on the world of Math that contains and is defined by the Gate, an interdimensional portal built nine thousand years ago by the Fylking. Bordered to the west by the Njorth Sea; to the north by Isil; to the east by Maan Ket; and to the south by Skolvarin. See also Fylking, Gate. See posts The Fylking and The Realm of Dyrregin. See Map of Dyrregin.

Dyrregin Guard: The army that defends the realm of Dyrregin. Commanded by Lord Coldevin.

Earticael: A royal house and the ruling seat of the realm of Fjorgin. Located roughly fifty leagues west of Tower Sie. See also Sie War.

Edon: A captain in the Dyrregin Guard. Commands the North Companies. See also North Companies.

Edros: A Warden of Dyrregin. Mysteriously vanishes near Tower Sor and is never found. See also Gatetower, Sor.

Elivag (ELL if aug): The eternal rhythm of the universe, the ebb and flow of life force in all things.

Elivag

Exile Sigil: An invocation that breaks the cords between a warden and the Fylking, rendering the warden invisible to them. Ruled by Elivag, it cannot be broken or undone. Rarely used and never to be considered except in dire circumstances. See also Banishing Sigil, Wardens’ Order.

Faersc Conservatory: A great hall nestled high in the Thorgrim Mountains, where wardens are trained and initiated into the Fylkings’ service. Run by Skadi, the Mistress of Faersc, and protected by the Fylking. See also Fylking, Wardens’ Order.

Fagel: The constable of Odr. See also Odr.

Farcas: A King of Dyrregin who preceded King Angvald. Cousin of Lord Detlef Halstaeg. Died by choking on the bones of a game bird. See also Detlef Halstaeg.

Fell: A town located on the west coast of Dyrregin, in southern Austr. Steep, built on cliffs and easily defended from invasion. Once owned by shipwrights.

Fenrir Brotherhood: An ancient order of sorcerers who serve Loki, one of the Old Gods. Founded in Fjorgin. Symbol is a black wolf surrounded by leaves, moons and thorns. See also Fjorgin, Leofwine, Old Gods.

Fjorgin: A realm west of Dyrregin, separated by the Njorth Sea. Ruling seat is Earticael. See also Sie War.

Fomor Mountains: A mountain range that borders Isil in the far north and overlooks the Wythe Strait.

Fylking (FELL king): A race of immortal warriors that came to the world of Math through a rare alignment and built a portal called the Gate in order to pass between dimensions at will. The Fylking are invisible to mortals except those who possess second sight, but can contact humans in visions, dreams or a sense of unreality. Fickle, powerful, adept shapeshifters, they are often feared and misunderstood by both humans and beings of the Otherworld, who revere them as gods. The Fylking fall into two orders: the High Fylking, warlords who occupy and protect the Gatetowers; and the Guardian Fylking, hired blades that protect wardens, the mortal seers who serve them. See also Gate, Gatetower, Guardian Fylking, High Fylking, Wardens’ Order. See post The Fylking.

The Fylking

Garmr: A Dyrregin Guard outpost in the Ogjan Mountains.

Gate: An interdimensional portal used by the Fylking to travel between the world of Math and other star systems. Pentagrammatic. Maintained by the Wardens’ Order and protected by the Fylking. See also Apex, Fylking, Gatetower, Wardens’ Order. See posts The Realm of Dyrregin, The Wardens’ Order.

Gate War: A war that occurred roughly twenty-five centuries ago when the Fylking’s enemy, the Niflsekt, came through the Gate. They trapped and killed the Fylking and instructed mortals to destroy the towers after the Niflsekt used them to leave. The war left Dyrregin in ruins for a thousand years, accursed, until the wardens’ descendants rebuilt the Gate. See also Gate, Niflsekt, Return of the Fylking, Wardens’ Order.

Gatekeepers: A term used by the Wardens of Dyrregin to refer to the High Fylking of Tower Sif, the grim, volatile Fylking warriors who initiate wardens into the order. See also High Fylking, Sif, Wardens’ Order.

Gatetower: One of ten stone towers that comprise the Gate. Each tower gathers light from the sun, moon and stars and focuses it into a complex crystal array, providing an energy source. Each tower stands on a point or intersection of the Gate pentacle. The outer towers (points) include Sif, Sin, Sae, Sef and Sie; and the inner towers (intersections) include Sor, Sol, Soc, Som and Sos. The gatetowers are manned by the High Fylking. See also Gate, High Fylking, Sie War, Wardens’ Order. See post The Wardens’ Order.

The Gate

The Gate

Genfawr: A captain in the King’s Rangers. Commands the West Branch.

Gottfrid: A male prostitute at the Pink Rose cathouse. Good with a sword.

Graebrok Forest: A large forest on the northern border of the Vale of Ason Tae. Surrounded by myths and dark tales. See also Ason Tae.

ravensGrayfen Aviary: One of many aviaries where the ravens that serve as messengers to the King’s Rangers are raised and trained. See also King’s Rangers.

Grayfen: A town located on the west coast of Dyrregin, in southern Austr. South of Fell and west of Lake Ceirn.

Guardian Fylking: Warriors who protect the Wardens of Dyrregin. In Fylking hierarchy, the Guardians are mercenaries. Each warden is accompanied by a small company of Guardians who choose him or her upon initiation, and appear in certain forms such as animals or elements so the warden will know them. Rarely, they appear in their natural forms as warriors. See also Fylking, High Fylking, Wardens’ Order.

Gunda: A spiteful, gossipy villager from Odr. See also Odr.

Haldor: A lieutenant in the Dyrregin Guard. Commands the North Companies stationed in Ason Tae. See also North Companies.

Halstaeg: A royal house in Merhafr. See also Arcmael, Detlef Halstaeg, Merhafr.

Heige: A King’s Ranger and friend of Othin of Cae Forres. An adept archer.

Hel: A goddess in the Fylking pantheon who rules the realms of the dead. Term is also used to refer to the underworld domain itself. See also Old Gods.

High Fylking: Elite warlords deployed to the gatetowers to protect the Gate from both human and nonhuman intervention. Always appear as fully armed warriors. Grim and generally intolerant of mortal concerns. See also Fylking, Gate, Guardian Fylking.

Ingvar: A captain in the Dyrregin Guard. Good at hand-to-hand combat.

Jarnstrom Forge: An old and renowned smithy on the North River in Odr. Known for swords and weaponry. Run by Master Damjan. See also Odr.

Kidge: The mistress of the Pink Rose cathouse. See also Pink Rose.

King’s Citadel: A large citadel in the center of Merhafr, the ruling seat of Dyrregin. Houses the king and royals of the realm.

King’s Rangers: An elite brotherhood of warriors who keep order in the wilds of Dyrregin. Employ a complex system of messaging through riders and ravens trained to scout patrol routes and recognize their rangers’ appearance. The rangers report directly to the king through five captains who command the areas within the arms of the Gate pentacle: North Branch, East Branch, Southeast Branch, Southwest Branch, and West Branch. Coat of arms is a sword and arrow crossed over a pale moon with an embossed interlocking pentacle spanning the diameter. Motto: “We keep the balance when the gods turn away.” See also Gate. See post Wildcards.

King's Rangers Coat of Arms

King’s Rangers Coat of Arms

Lake Ceirn: A large lake in southern Austr.

Larfen: a township south of Tower Sol, east of the Fasos Hills.

Leofwine: Seneschal of Lord Detlef Halstaeg. Fjorginan, House Earticael. Member of the Fenrir Brotherhood. See also Detlef Halstaeg, Fenrir Brotherhood.

Wolf WildcardLone Wolf: An inn located northeast of Vota near the border of Wyrvith Forest. See also Wyrvith Forest.

Lysalfheim Hall: A meeting hall in the King’s Citadel in Merhafr. Part of the Rangers’ Square used for meals, companionship, gatherings and official meetings. Named after a midwinter constellation which aligns with the upper three points of the Gate pentacle. See also King’s Citadel, King’s Rangers, Rangers’ Square.

Maan Ket: The realm bordering Dyrregin east of the Cyrilian Mountains. See Map of Dyrregin.

Magnfred: First King of Dyrregin to claim the throne after the Gate War. Started the Blackthorn Guild. See also Blackthorn Guild, Gate War.

Magreda: A prostitute at the Pink Rose cathouse. A friend of Othin of Cae Forres.

Melisande: A woman of Odr in the Vale of Ason Tae. Lives in Graebrok Forest near Tower Sif. Nicknamed Millie. A renowned knitter and lover of Othin of Cae Forres. Considered fey, touched by the gods. See also Ason Tae, Sif.

Merhafr: (mer HAHF er): Ruling seat of Dyrregin. A large port clustered around the King’s Citadel on the western coast of the realm, near Tower Sor. Includes an inner ring of walls and a second ring that forms a semicircle from the northern side of the harbor to the Taeson River that bounds the city to the south. See also Dyrregin, Sor.

Mermaid: A cathouse in Grayfen.

Mimir: A large, wooded swamp east of the Rue Hills, in Patanin. Treacherous and difficult to navigate.

Minos: A royal house in Earticael, the ruling seat of Fjorgin.

Moor’s Edge: An inn located in the wilds of Ylgr near the northwestern coast of Dyrregin on the Wythe Strait.

Nestor: A King’s Ranger deployed to the North Branch. Took over the Ason Tae patrol from Othin of Cae Forres.

Niflsekt: The ancient enemy of the Fylking. A race much like the Fylking, immortal and unseen, yet serving the dark side of balance. Responsible for the Gate War in which Dyrregin was annihilated and left in ruins. See also Fylking, Gate War.

Niflsekt

Niflsekt

Night Guild: Hired blades who protect the prostitutes in Dyrregin’s cathouses. The Guild was originally established by the kings of Dyrregin to honor what had become a venerable occupation in a realm that had known centuries of war. Guardsmen mark themselves by wearing a black band from shoulder to waist. Colloquially referred to by rangers and guardsmen as “bats.”

Norn: A being in the Fylking pantheon. The Norns rule fate and destiny; spinners, weavers, workers of magic. The term is used by the Fylking to refer to Melisande. See also Fylking, Melisande.

North Companies: A large force of Dyrregin Guard stationed in the Thorgrim Mountains and the Vale of Ason Tae, to protect the realm from invasion from the south and west. Commanded by Captain Edon.

North Mountain Road: The main thoroughfare from Vota to the Vale of Ason Tae. Passes through Wyrvith Forest, the Thorgrim Mountains and the Wolftooth Pass.

Odr: A village on the North River in the Vale of Ason Tae. Close to Tower Sif, the Apex of the Gate and its most perilous location. Having settled centuries ago so near the Fylking’s domain, Odrians are reputed to be reckless and fey. See also Apex, Ason Tae, Sif.

Ogjan Mountains: A mountain range in northern Austr, east of the Thorgrim Mountains bordering the Vale of Ason Tae.

Old Gods: The pantheon originally introduced to Math by the Fylking. Includes, among others: Balder, a sun god; Freya, a goddess of fertility; Hel, keeper of the realms of the dead; Loki, a mischievous trickster; Thor, a god of war and thunder; and Othin, the Allfather. See also Fylking, Othin.

Olja: Wife of Damjan, the Master of House Jarnstrom. See also Jarnstrom Forge.

Olsc Amathin: A realm in southern Maan Ket bordering Dyrregin.

Others: Beings who inhabit the Otherworld. See next.

Otherworld: The vast realm of the unseen existing beyond time and space; the source and reflection of physical events. Inhabited by an infinite variety of beings referred to as Others, including nature spirits, elves, goblins, phooka, planetary entities and other natural forces. This includes the Fylking, who occupy the unseen dimensions and are often, though not always, respected as gods. The Otherworld can be perceived by mortals with second sight, though interaction can be dangerous and is ill advised without training and protection. See also Fylking. See posts The Phooka, Goblins and Creepy Horses.

Others

Othin of Cae Forres

Othin of Cae Forres

Othin of Cae Forres: A King’s Ranger of the North Branch. Melisande’s lover. Named after Othin, the Allfather. See also Othin (next). See post Ranger of the North Branch.

Othin: One of the Old Gods; also called Allfather, Magician, Wanderer, Trickster and Raven God. Accompanied by ravens and wolves, he often appears as a mysterious blue-cloaked figure. A notorious shapeshifter, he is considered tricky, unreliable, yet wise. See also Old Gods. See posts The Raven God and Norse Mythology and the Voices in My Head.

Otter River Valley: A valley in the southern foothills of the Vale of Ason Tae. A day’s journey from Odr.

Ottersun: A far northern village beneath the Fomor Mountains overlooking the Wythe Strait.

Patanin: A realm between the Thorgrim Mountains and the Taeson River.

Phooka

The Phooka

Phooka: A creature of the Otherworld. A shape changer, part human at times, or part or all animal such as a goat or a horse, always with dark fur. Bleak, uncanny and generally wicked, yet can also be beneficial depending on mood or circumstance. Considered a prince in the between realms. See also Otherworld. See post The Phooka.

Pink Rose: A renowned cathouse in the coastal city of Fell. Managed by Mistress Kidge.

Pisskin: Melisande’s cat.

Prederi: A King’s Ranger and a friend of Othin of Cae Forres. See also King’s Rangers.

Rangers’ Square: A garrison in the King’s Citadel in Merhafr, containing rooms, baths, kitchens and training yards in which rangers live between patrols. Strategically positioned on the eastern side of the citadel closest to the gates. See also King’s Rangers.

Rangers: See King’s Rangers.

Return of the Fylking: A date in Dyrregin history used to indicate a number of years after the Fylking returned following the Gate War. The Fylking arrived in Dyrregin roughly 9000 years ago, and reigned for 6500 years until the Niflsekt destroyed the Gate. The realm lay accursed for 1000 years until the wardens returned and rebuilt the towers. After 300 years, the Fylking returned through the Gate, and the Dyrregin calendar marked a new age at that time. The present time in which Outpost takes place is Return of the Fylking, 1245. See also Arrival of the Fylking, Fylking, Gate War, Niflsekt.

The Ages of Dyrregin

The Ages of Dyrregin

Rosalie: The daughter of Lord Detlef Halstaeg and younger sister to Arcmael.

Sae: An outer gatetower located in southern Dyrregin roughly twenty-five leagues from the Skolvarin border. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Tower Sef

Tower Sef

Sef: An outer gatetower located in the Njorth Sea off Dyrregin’s southwestern coast. Over millennia, the sea engulfed the granite shoals around this tower, isolating it from land. The wardens now tend it by sea using boats. Sailors avoid it for fear of the Fylking. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Sie War: A war two hundred years ago between Dyrregin and Fjorgin. Since the establishment of the Gate by the Fylking, Dyrregin held the coastal lands in eastern Fjorgin, including Tower Sie. Fjorgin claimed and won all the lands west of the Njorth Sea. Afterwards, the two realms drew up the Njorth Treaty. See also Sie.

Sie: An outer gatetower located in the realm of Fjorgin across the Njorth Sea. Once part of Dyrregin, Tower Sie was lost in the Sie War, but is still tended by the Wardens’ Order under the protection of the Fylking. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking, Sie War.

Tower Sif

Tower Sif

Sif: An outer gatetower located on the northernmost point of the Gate in the Vale of Ason Tae. Called the Apex, Tower Sif merges with other worlds and is the first line of defense from attack by the Fylking’s enemies. Guarded accordingly by grim Fylking warlords, Sif is enshrouded by dark tales. See also Apex, Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking, Niflsekt. See post The Wardens’ Order.

Sin: An outer gatetower located between the realm of Patanin and the Cyrilian Mountains bordering eastern Dyrregin. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Skadi: Mistress of the Faersc Conservatory. A seer who serves the Fylking and trains the Wardens of Dyrregin. See also Faersc Conservatory, Fylking, Wardens’ Order.

Skaut: A rangers’ station located in the southern foothills of the Vale of Ason Tae. See also King’s Rangers.

Skolvarin: The realm bordering Dyrregin to the south. Separated by the Great River. The army that defends the realm is called the Skolvarin Guard. See Map of Dyrregin.

Soc: An inner gatetower located in Vinland. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Sol: An inner gatetower located south of the Taeson River, fifty leagues due east of Tower Sor. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Som: An inner gatetower located in southern Dyrregin fifty leagues southwest of Vinland. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Sor: An inner gatetower located on the western coast of Dyrregin near the port city of Merhafr. Rumored to be inhabited by sullen Fylking warlords with a proclivity for harming mortals. Site of the mysterious disappearance of a warden named Edros. See also Edros, Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking, Merhafr.

Sos: An inner gatetower located twenty-five leagues due east of Vinland on a peninsula on the western coast of Dyrregin. See also Gate, Gatetower, High Fylking.

Spruce Road: A road that picks up near the northern fork of the Blanch River in Austr and passes through the valley on the western flank of the Thorgrim Mountains. Often used as an alternate route into the Vale of Ason Tae in the winter, when the Wolftooth Pass is snowed in. See also North Mountain Road.

Roads and Rivers

Stone River: A township in the Ogjan Mountains on the road between Dyrregin’s western coast and the Vale of Ason Tae.

Stony: A long-standing member of the Night Guild who watches over the Pink Rose cathouse. See also Night Guild.

Straelos: Son of Lord Detlef Halstaeg and younger brother to Arcmael.

Taeson River: A large river south of the Fasos Hills that passes through Merhafr and into the Njorth Sea.

Tahslen: A port city in southern Dyrregin, due east of Tower Sef in the Njorth Sea.

Tasn: A King’s Ranger and friend of Othin of Cae Forres.

Thorgrim Mountains: The great mountain range in Northern Dyrregin that borders the Vale of Ason Tae. Home of the Faersc Conservatory. The Wolftooth Pass provides the most direct route over the mountains to the north. See also Faersc Conservatory.

Tower View: A tavern in the lower city of Merhafr that stands on the Taeson River in view of Tower Sor. Colloquially nicknamed the “Sour View” in reference to the grisly and mysterious tales that surround the gatetower. See also Sor.

Ulfhidin: A King’s Ranger deployed to the North Branch by Lord Detlef Halstaeg under shady circumstances.

Valdros: A township and ruling seat of the northern interior realms of Fjorgin. Standard is a hawk in flight on an evergreen background, and warriors of the realm are marked by a tattoo showing the phase of the moon when they were born.

Vargn: A Fjorginan warlock of the Blackthorn Guild. Once apprenticed to the Faersc Conservatory to be trained as a warden, he was refused by the High Fylking of Tower Sif. See also Blackthorn Guild, Gatekeepers, High Fylking.

Veil: The invisible boundary between the mortal dimension and the Otherworld. Known to be more easily crossed in certain locations, or during certain seasonal or celestial events. Can be opened or closed by the Fylking or by mortals trained in the magical arts. See also Otherworld, Wyrvith Forest.

Vinso: Son of Damjan, the Master of House Jarnstrom. See also Jarnstrom Forge.

Vota: A city on the outskirts of Wyrvith Forest.

Warden: See Wardens’ Order.

Wardens’ Order: An order of seers established nine thousand years ago with the arrival of the Fylking, who taught humans the arts of interdimensional perception and the properties of light, energy, crystals and architecture. The wardens built the towers, watched over them with human eyes and maintained them over millennia, gathering the energies of celestial bodies to provide a bridge for their immortal warlords. In return the Fylking protected them, and gave them the honor of representing them to humankind. See also Fylking, Gate. See post The Wardens’ Order.

Weaver: A term used by beings in the Otherworld to refer to Melisande. See also Melisande, Otherworld.

Whisper: A raven handler at the Grayfen Aviary, so nicknamed because she speaks to the birds in very soft tones. See also Grayfen Aviary.

Wildcards: A set of game cards showing wild animals painted in their natural habitats and representing their abilities and place in the order of things. A favorite game played by rangers. See also King’s Rangers. See post Wildcards.

Wildcards

Wildcards

Wyrvith Forest: A vast, ancient forest in the foothills of the Thorgrim Mountains south of the Wolftooth Pass. Reputed to be a dense haunt of Others, the forest is marked by a thousands-year-old entrance, tall and covered in carvings of the Old Gods. A raven, a messenger of the Otherworld, is perched on top, its half-lifted wings representing the creature’s presence on both sides of the Veil. See also Old Gods, Otherworld, Veil.

Yarrow: A hedge witch of the Blackthorn Guild. Lives in the Otter River Valley in the Vale of Ason Tae.

Ylgr: A desolate realm of marshes, brush, bogs and dark woodlands, located in northern Dyrregin between the Fomor and Ogjan Mountains on the Wythe Strait. Not patrolled by the rangers. See also King’s Rangers.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Outpost Cover ArtOutpost, Book One in The Fylking.

A race of immortal warriors who live by the sword.
A gate between the worlds.
Warriors, royals, seers and warlocks living in uneasy peace on one side of the Veil.
Until now.

© F.T. McKinstry 2016. All Rights Reserved.

The Trickster

The Trickster

Birds in the corvid family have always intrigued me, ravens and crows among them. These birds are extremely intelligent and surrounded by myths and fairy tales. Among other things, they are said to move between the worlds, making them harbingers and messengers of the Otherworld. They are playful, clever and at times devious, giving them a reputation as tricksters.

The hooded crow (Corvus cornix) is striking. It is found across Europe and in parts of the Middle East. Also called a hoodiecrow, corbie or grey crow, it is ash gray with a black head and throat, wings and tail. It looks like it’s wearing a black cloak with the hood down. How cool is that?

This fine creature has a special place in the story of Outpost, a fantasy novel woven with Norse mythology, mythical beings, swords and sorcery. In this tale, the hoodiecrow is a trickster par excellence, appearing as a particularly curious bird, a dream, a synchronistic event, or a charm given to a warrior by his love. To a knitter with the power of the earth in her hands, the crow takes form as an otherworldly rider.

A warrior on a gray horse thumped over the fresh snow, spruce boughs swaying with silvery restlessness in his wake. His horse moved strangely, as if it had too many legs. The rider wore exquisitely wrought mail of ash gray, black leggings and boots, and a mantle that covered his head and shoulders with feathery black. The hilts of two fine swords glinted above his shoulder. He reined in before the cottage and looked up, revealing the smooth, straight beak of a crow. His eyes glittered like stars.

Melisande stood in the snow in her bare feet, gazing up at the crow warrior like a child. He was beautiful, strange and vast, like a force of nature. He was not Fylking. Not Otherworld, either. He was beyond that.

“Beware.” The sound was the voice of the wind, his voice.

To a wayward seer at odds with the Otherworld, the hooded crow appears to spring him from a trap, a fortuitous event that comes with a very high price.

“Self-pity is powerful magic, is it not?” the crow said. Its pale ash body glowed beneath the pitch mantle of its cloak. “It turns the ridiculous into the sublime.” It cocked its head mockingly.

After delivering an annoying lecture, of course.

As with any trickster, the crow hides its agenda in mystery and surprise. What looks like guidance, mockery, companionship or a warning can—and most likely will—throw one into trouble. But that’s the way it works, with tricksters. Chaos leads to transformation.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Outpost Cover ArtOutpost, Book One in The Fylking.

A race of immortal warriors who live by the sword.
A gate between the worlds.
Warriors, royals, seers and warlocks living in uneasy peace on one side of the Veil.
Until now.

© F.T. McKinstry 2015. All Rights Reserved.

The Riven God

The Riven God is the fourth book in the Chronicles of Ealiron, a heroic fantasy series that revolves around a warrior called Lorth of Ostarin, an assassin and wizard who serves the old powers.

In the world of Ealiron, it is known that wizards and gods rarely involve themselves in the affairs of mortals. They see war or the collapse of empires as they would a leaf decaying on a forest floor. Everything has its time. This changes when a mysterious rift appears in the timeline of the world, cloaked on the isle of Tromb in the far northern Gray Isles.

Rhinne of Tromb, a lonely princess at odds with a turbulent monarchy, has old magic in her veins. When weary defiance and a penchant for a fight lands her on the wrong side of a dark order of warlocks festering in the shadows of the realm, Rhinne is forced to flee, pursued by the king’s assassins. Her brother Wulfgar, a seasoned warrior, is left facing war.

Far away, Lorth of Ostarin, a powerful wizard, learns that something untoward is happening in the Gray Isles, where he has a dark history. When Rhinne is delivered into his hands under unlikely circumstances, he discovers she is not only being hunted by foreign assassins, but also has the ability to channel immortals. Wounded and distrustful, she escapes him with the help of a god thought destroyed centuries ago. Only he knows her secrets, and he’s not telling.

Believing his sister dead, Wulfgar arrives from overseas to the wizards’ citadel, heavy with grief and bearing information that moves the wizards to declare war. Through a labyrinth of assassins, thieves, spies and seers, Rhinne, Wulfgar and Lorth return to Tromb accompanied by an army, a mysterious raven and a war god with a private agenda. In the battle that awaits them, they must find and destroy a cruel, devious entity who has something to hide and can turn the fabric of reality into horrific desolation with a thought.

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Can be read as a standalone story.

Novel, 359 pages
Second Edition
Ebook includes a Glossary and a link to Maps.
Glossary
Map: Sourcesee
Map: Sourcesee and East
Map: The Gray Isles

“The pace never slackens as the characters move from one adventure to another in this epic novel. Background explanations are well-integrated and it’s easy to get your bearings in the complex yet emotionally solid mythology of Ealiron. Romance, magic, and pathological power manipulations unreel alongside fascinating swordplay that rarely turns out as you might expect or hope.” – Michael D. Smith, author of the Jack Commer Series (See Entire Review)

“F.T. McKinstry is a master of this genre. Her prose, plot and character development make her books an incredible joy to read. The Chronicles of Ealiron is my absolute favorite series. McKinstry masterfully weaves an intricate tale into the complicated magical world she’s created in a manner that completely captivates the reader without overload…stories are full of magic, mystics, warriors, cults, conspiracies, deities, fully developed and interesting. The main character Lorth is a masterpiece. Best stuff out there. Please keep writing.” – Review on Amazon (See Entire Review)

“Another excellent book. It was excitement from beginning to the end. I wholly appreciate McKinstry’s strong female characters. I can’t wait to read more from this very talented writer.” – Review on Amazon

Little Tree, by F.T. McKinstry

Read for free with Kindle Unlimited.
Amazon

© F.T. McKinstry 2018. All Rights Reserved.